Tag Archives: children’s books

Troll Swap by Leigh Hodgkinson

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Troll Swap by Leigh Hodgkinson

Troll Swap by Leigh Hodgkinson caught my eye on a book cart of recently returned materials at my library.  The bright red color of the cover drew me in to initially think this could be a holiday book for Christmas.  An image of a little girl with pig tails and a friendly looking monster standing next to her are illustrated on the cover of the book.  The two are wearing matching shirts and both have antennae on their heads.  The angle of their eyes looking at each other is friendly and approachable, almost begging to be asked what they are talking about.  The cover art is simplistic, imaginative, and boldly colored.  The back of the book gives readers another glimpse into what the relationship between this little girl and the monster may be.  The little girl has taken her boots off and is jumping on a couch while the monster stands on a rock waving to the little girl.  It is obvious before even opening the book that this little girl has a mischievous side to her and is full of energy, while the monster seems to be more of a polite observer.

The book itself is made of nice materials, a firm binding, heavy weight pages that would not tear easily from frequent use and beautiful ink for the font and illustrations of the story. Opening the book to read the inside of the dust jacket brings to light the fact that the little girl and the monster are out of place in their worlds, bringing light behind the meaning of the title Troll Swap.  The author begins the story by introducing both of the characters to the readers and gives information about what they like to do.  Each character is seen as friendly and easy to relate to.  The monster’s name is Timothy Limpet and he is a troll.  Timothy does not enjoy doing troll like things with his troll family.  He is very polite and considerate of his family and friends.  As the author transitions to introduce the other main character it is clear through the illustrations that she is not like Timothy.  The little girl’s name is Tabitha Lumpit and she is loud, messy and completely opposite of her very neat family.   It seems natural that these two characters should meet and ultimately decide to swap places.  This book is written to appeal to children age preschool – 2nd Grade.  Troll Swap addresses a timeless underlying theme, with humor, teaching readers and listeners to celebrate themselves and be accepting of differences in others.

The beginning of the story opens with Timothy introducing himself.  It is quickly observed that the voice in which Timothy speaks is defined by neat, specific, underlined font that embodies his character.  The font used as a voice for his family and other trolls is loud and abrasive, all capital letters varying in size and shape.  The size of the font on each page is larger but not overwhelming.  Many pages have a lot of white space which allows for the words and illustrations to pop off the pages.  As readers are introduced to Tabitha Lumpit the same font used for Timothy’s family and friends is used for her voice.  This little girl is filled with energy and lacks restraint in controlling her thoughts which quickly spill out of her.  The voices of the children around her and her parents are written in the same font that Timothy speaks.  It is evident through the font alone that these characters are living in worlds where they do not fit in.

As the story begins it quickly displays, not simply through different font, but through the illustrated emotions on each of the characters faces that they feel out of place.  Children will enjoy reading this story as it is humorous and easy to relate to in a world where they too are growing and beginning to understand how they fit into the world in which they live.  Timothy and Tabitha are both terribly sad about not fitting in when they first bump into each.  They quickly notice that they are the image of how they think they should be in order to fit in.  It is only natural that they decide to swap places.  Through switching places these two characters initially find great comfort in fitting into these worlds with others just like them.  It doesn’t take long, however, before both of them miss their old worlds and the excitement being different brings into their everyday lives.  The friends and families of these characters also begin to miss the unique characteristics of Timothy and Tabitha and find that life is missing something and feels rather dull without them.  As the story reaches its climax both characters realize that life where everyone acts the same is boring, “it was time to swap back and for both of them to go home, where they belonged.”

Troll Swap takes place in two different worlds and is told in third person.  The messy loud world that Timothy lives in and the neat, polite world Tabitha lives in.  The voice the author gives to the story allows readers to clearly differentiate between the two worlds.  Much more color and higher contrast of background and images is used in the troll world.  When in the human world the images are more simplistic on a white background.  The clean feel to these pages in Tabitha’s world highlights the text and images of the characters. The author of this story has written a delightful story for children that is age appropriate and straightforward.  Listeners will enjoy the uncomplicated vocabulary and moments of laugh out loud humor that highlights the oddities that each of us possess that make us special and unique.

Hodgkinson, L. (2014). Troll swap. New York: Candlewick/Nosy Crow.

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Shoes! Shoes! Shoes!

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Shoes! Shoes! Shoes!

What girl doesn’t love shoes?!?!

I’ve been blessed with a little princess that loves to accessorize. Shoes happen to be among one of her favorite. A trip to Target always includes a walk down the shoe aisle and undoubtedly I end up hearing pleas for a pair of new sparkle shoes. If you have a little girl of your own, beware of Target and their ploy to wrangle in any little diva looking to sport a little sparkle and shine.

As I always do, when I find something that my daughter is intersted in, I run to the library or do a little online researching at home to see where I can find some fun tie ins with books. There’s nothing more enticing to a child than reading about something they are already interested in!

For a much more laid back Sunday post, here’s a few fun titles we’ve run across that entertain the Imelda Marcos in all of us.

Snow, Sledding and A Fresh Perspective!

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Snow, Sledding and A Fresh Perspective!

WELCOME!

What better way to embrace the winter season than by sailing down a hill with your favorite friends! Freshly fallen snow, sunshine and a free weekend brought about a day of play and a healthy change in perspective.

How often do we get caught up in the daily grind and forget to embrace such moments? Not only did we have fun inner tube sledding for the first time, the girls opened a multitude of doors that resulted in discussions about where does snow come from?, why does it snow?, what’s lake effect snow?, does everyone get snow?, and so on!

How is it that often the simplest activities lead to some of the biggest opportunities for understanding the world around us?  I encourage you to bundle up your little ones and embark on a discovery of the winter landscape outside your door. For those fortunate enough to be able to “feel” the change in seasons, take full advantage!  The world is an open playground just waiting for you to explore!

To keep with tradition on a cold winter day, cozy up with a cup of hot cocoa and a couple of good reads!  Here’s a couple of suggested titles to get you started

               

 

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